ACHIEVING THE SDGS, IT IS EVERYONE’S BUSINESS

Aug 8, 2017

By Roy Trivedy 

A UNIVERSAL APPROACH: WHY THE ACHIEVEMENT OF THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS (SDGS) MUST NOT BE DONE IN ISOLATION

In 2013, a distinguished panel of prime ministers, leaders from civil society, private sector and government from across the globe provided a landmark report on the Post-2015 Development Agenda.

Supported by the United Nations, the Report of the High Level Panel assessed the progress that had been achieved on reducing global poverty after the first 13 years of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and concluded that some significant milestones had been achieved:

 “…since the millennium (we) have seen the fastest reduction in poverty in human history: here are half a billion fewer people living below an international poverty line of US $1.25 a day. Child death rates have fallen by more than 30%, with about three million children’s lives saved each year compared to 2000. Deaths from malaria have fallen by one quarter. This unprecedented progress had been driven by a combination of economic growth, better policies, and the global commitment to the MDGs, which set out an inspirational rallying cry for the whole world.”

Despite the amazing successes of the MDGs, the first set of international development goals that came into effect in 2000, were generally perceived to be largely the concern of governments, official development agencies and non-governmental organisations (NGOs).

When global leaders met to agree on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in 2015, they recognised that governments and the ‘international aid system’ alone would not be able to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity by 2030. They recognised that the development agenda needed to be universal and not just targeted for achievement by poorer countries.

A significant ‘transformative shift’ needed to underpin the Global Goals and this required the construction of a new set of partnerships involving governments (national and local) working with the business community, academia, private philanthropy, as well as people living in poverty, civil society and traditionally marginalised groups. Multilateral organisations and others were also challenged to lead the way to remove the barriers that hold people back and end inequality of opportunity that blights the lives of many people at local, national and international levels.

As we reach the second anniversary since the launch of the SDGs, how are these new partnerships being forged and how is progress being achieved?

This essay argues action needs to be taken on two main fronts:

  1. Governments, organisations and institutions worldwide need to make consistent and concerted efforts to integrate the SDGs in their plans and operations. It looks at what has been achieved so far.
  2. Leading businesses need to embrace the SDGs globally. Many global businesses are already doing this, we analyse some of the leading initiatives and look at how businesses and communities in Papua New Guinea, which achieved none of the MDGs, are working together to achieve the SDGs. 

Read more on http://impakter.com/achieving-sustainable-business/

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